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FOR COUPLES (AND LOVERS)

Posted by on Mar 13, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

FOR COUPLES (AND LOVERS)

Thanks to a tweet by Jeremiah Owyang (aka @JowYang) I found out about this new “network” that may be pointing out to a new kind of “social” The kind that’s closed and limited to the one person of your choice. In this case only two. The name is simply “Pair”, self-described as: “An interactive way for you and your partner to share everything”. With concepts such as “thumbkissing” and “sketch together”, the iPhone app has some interesting features. This, opens up a bunch of questions, each of which could be the subject of a thesis on its own: Data @JowYang is wondering about the intricacies of managing and leveraging the data produced by such a network. Joining is free now but they’ll need a business model sooner or later. Leveraging the data of one person’s social activity is complex enough; try generated by two people. Three targeting opportunities become available: what’s the behavior of one person, the other AND what is it when they’re together “Nicheworks” Much has been written on the advent of concept, where the very popularity of social networks is viewed as eventually as a shot in its own foot. In the beginning, Facebook might have only grouped your close like-minded friends. But with close to a billion member today, the like-minded only part may long be gone thus potentially reducing the appeal and driving the search for new like-minded only social networks. Cheating Rumor has it that 20% of US divorces are to blame on Facebook, @OWStarr (aka Oliver Starr) rightly raises the point of increased cheating. The Pair network being at the opposite of Facebook from a “privacy” standpoint: two and only two can use it at a time. Let’s note that the creators seem to have anticipated these critics to a certain extent; i.e. pairing can only be done with one person at a time; no polygamy possible. “Social” Another interesting question is raised by @RicDragon (aka Ric Dragon) and potentially challenges the very definition of “social”. When a network is limited to only two people does it really warrant to be called a social network? Maybe, maybe not. Any other points this raises in your mind? Share with me in the comments section below. I’ll keep an eye on this interesting “animal” and come back on each of the above...

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A GUIDE TO THE NEW FACEBOOK TIMELINE (INFOGRAPHIC)

Posted by on Mar 8, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

A GUIDE TO THE NEW FACEBOOK TIMELINE (INFOGRAPHIC)

On March 30th, Facebook will switch all profiles and pages to the new timeline display. If you haven’t made the switch yet, your profile and page may show a “gaping hole” after that date and until you do. Even if you have made the switch here’s a handy guide from the folks at iframe apps with some great tips. For those living under an online rock, with the “Timeline” is the new Facebook profile with which Facebook wants you to “Tell your life story” (…) “through photos, friendships and personal milestones like graduating or traveling to new places”. Let’s see what...

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WHAT THE WEB’S 3.0 VERSION MIGHT LOOK LIKE

Posted by on Feb 28, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

WHAT THE WEB’S 3.0 VERSION MIGHT LOOK LIKE

Jim Kohlenberger recently released a paper outlining what the Internet’s third act might look like. He is a former White House policy adviser to two U.S Presidents and is President of JK Strategies – a public policy consulting practice. The report points out a now well understood concept by the geekiest amongst us, the “Internet of Things”. Marissa Mayer, Google’s Vice President of Location and Local Services, back in May 2010 started explaining in her presentation entitled: “The Physics of Data”, what the impact of the average person uploading 15 times more data in 2009 than they did just three years ago, might do to the web as we know today. In hi report, Jim Kohlenberger outlines that the nternet has undergone three major revolutions in connecting: places then people and now on its way to connect things. In it Jim Kohlenberger outlines a series societal benefits but also the risks that may stifle this coming revolution. Benefits: Smarter transportation: mobile applications like Waze are already in that field, connecting cars to each other: Fully utilizing smart traffic technology could cut fuel consumption on urban roadways by as much as 20 percent Smarter energy and better environment: By 2020, the utility sector is expected to make up to 62% of M2M connected devices Smarter Business Smarter payments /POS: One especially powerful device application is new point-of-sale services that can create new business opportunities, give consumers more choices, and created new pay-as-you go business models. Smarter homes Smarter Security Smarter Cities Smarter healthcare and patient monitoring All of this will be accelerated by technological advances; Moor’es Law making it that faster, smaller, smarter, and more capable devices are possible every 18 months. Higher resolution sensors can enable to us to connect to our world in ways beyond just our seix senses. Steve Jobs was definitely on to something by democratizing access to touch devices; thin film technologies could soon turn almost any surface into a connected touchscreen display, and enable affordable intelligence to be implanted into almost anything. Near Field Communication (NFC) technologies can enable new forms of mobile commerce and better human comuter interaction can unlock new applications. google/Ipsos’ latest research report on Mobile Internet and Smartphone Adoption is already demonstrating a current trend in the 3.0 direction where people are now more often using phone-like devices than laptops or desktops to access the internet. Stifling Risks. This coming digital device deluge will further accelerate mobile opportunity and exacerbate the looming spectrum crunch. But lack of available spectrum could stall, stifle, or even stop these benefits from coming to fruition. Facilitating Steps Five key steps are advocated by the report: Catalyze innovation Through a Wireless Innovation Fund (WIN) Accelerate Smart infrastructure Development and Deployment Advance a Smarter Electric Grid to Boost Efficiency and cut energy costs Speed up the Medical Device Approval Processes for Wireless Connected Technologies Ensure that more of these connected devices are made in America by Supporting American Leadership in Advanced Manufacturing The Full report can be accessed below. Privacy remains is of course a concern and plenty of conspiracy theories can be imagined from here. What’s the craziest one you can think of? Let us know in the comments below. The Internet’s Third Act: The Connected Device...

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SEARCH:GOOGLE AND FACEBOOK MAKE LOVE OR WAR?

Posted by on Feb 17, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

SEARCH:GOOGLE AND FACEBOOK MAKE LOVE OR WAR?

Much has been said about Google modifying the way it is searched and it switching to semantic.  Semantic meaning: human speak rather then what it currently uses: machine speak that humans can understand.  On the other side of the ring, is Facebook.  The mastodon social network has done well enough with advertising and Facebook credits to allow it an IPO – latest and highest valuations are putting it at above $100 billion.  But that was only the end of the beginning.  It is now a public company and the pressure is on for revenue growth. Where’s the money on the web today?  There’s a lot in “big data”.  Who’s the king of big data today?  Google is probably one of them.  And how does Google make money from “big data”? By making it easily searchable to two million queries every minute. Data to search, Facebook has a lot of it.  Not only but it is social.  by “social” read, generated and stamped by the “natural” activities of humans not yet looking to game the keywords density rules.  Data that searchable AND social may thus be better at quenching our ever increasing thirst for search. But, do you think of Facebook when you’re about to type a search query in a text field? Have you tried searching for something on Facebook other than people or brands? Not very quenching was it. That’s the next crusade brewing on the web.  The crusade of who will win the search war. In the first crusade, Yahoo was left struggling in the dust, leaderless.  Bing arrived too late.  Both neglected the social element and, at the moment, do not really pose great threats to that first round’s winner. Google is ubiquitous, it is a conversational verb.  Better, most of us don’t imagine life without it and its myriad free products.  This is not to mean that Google has no threats looming over it. . Au contraire! The looming threat comes from that exact social layer it has tried to nail for years.  The 2009 Google Wave Fever does illustrate that Google had well understood the importance of social for its very future competitive survival. The basic conclusion is this: no algorithm – no matter how sophisticated – can, for now, replace human likes, dislikes and other social interactions about pieces of content they run into, in places where they spend increasing amounts of their lives.  So, to taking stock, the current big data status is like this: Shouldn’t these guys just merge? #not Third time’s a charm, Google now has a social network that may finally prove successful in the form of Google+.  And for one ups, just in case, it is now adding “semantic” which allows it to look beyond search terms and into the actual meanings. How’s that for social 360? Facebook is reportedly hard at work making its big data search worthy, and they aren’t kidding.  It’s efforts include the help of an ex-googler and co-founder of Google Maps: Lars Rasumssen.  Hopefully they’re also thinking semantic, searching non-keyword optimized content – should we call it “semantic content” for all the socially meaningful baggage it is supposed to carry? – may not prove efficient when using machine algorithms. Let us not forget Twitter’s famed fire-hose.  Which we haven’t seen much about as yet in terms...

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SIZE MATTERS! PINTEREST HATES THUMBNAILS

Posted by on Jan 28, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

SIZE MATTERS! PINTEREST HATES THUMBNAILS

Some social networks sometimes by their very purpose generate a need that few really thought of crucial importance, consider what just happened. I ran today into a @huffingtonpost article tweeted by @tedCoine, titled “The End of Capitalism – So What’s Next?” by Klaus Schawb (Founder & President of The Davos World Economic Forum). I First tried to share the article through Pinterest but surprise! I got a message that no large images were found in the article (see picture above). You may or may not have gotten on the @Pinterest band wagon, I recently signed up and still playing around with the new so called wonder network. Now ranked third most popular social network in the US, touted as generating more traffic then most out there and even having made some companies change their business model, hear of @Pinerly? This company was using Pinterest to market their original product, turned out so successful that they decided to start a Pinterest Analytics platform. So, whatever you do online if traffic is what you need and you’re looking to leverage Pinterest for that, make sure to include “Large images” in whatever you produce. in the article i wanted to share, putting it out on Pinterest without picture seemed to defeat the purpose. I then looked for a related version. Found one, with a large image and a very instructive Harvard Business Review (@HarvardBiz) video interview of Michael E. Porter about the “shared value”...

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